This Week In Hate – October 11: The Spatial Spread of Hate Violence Pre and Post Election

Prepared by Radha Modi

At the 11 month mark since the election of Donald Trump, there have been 184 documented incidents of hate violence against those who identify or are perceived as Muslim, Sikh, Hindu, South Asian, Arab, or Middle Eastern compared to the total of 130 from the year before the election. The rise in hate violence this year is a 42% increase from the pre-election year. Further, SAALT finds that new incidents occur at the rate of four to five a week. For example, since the last SAALT hate violence report on October 3, 2017, there have been five new reported hate incidents.

Figure 2 organizes incidents of hate violence into descriptive categories and compares totals pre and post-election. The three categories of hate violence are incidents of physical violence, incidents of verbal/written threats, and incidents of property damage. Verbal and written threats and hateful rhetoric are the most common type of violence against those who identify or are perceived as Muslim, Sikh, Hindu, South Asian, Arab, or Middle Eastern. Since November 8, 2016, there have been 73 documented verbal and written hate incidents. While there has been a dramatic increase in hate rhetoric over the past 11 months compared to the prior year, many verbal and written incidents go unreported. Actual physical attack due to hate and bias is the second most common type of hate violence against communities represented by SAALT. There have been 63 physical assaults in the last 11 months. This total is on par with the total from the pre-election year. Finally, property damage often consisting of vandalism comprises the third category of hate incidents with 48 unique incidents occurring since November 8, 2016.

The five most recent incidents of violence occurring over the past week have targeted Muslim families, businesses, and places of worship. On October 5, Islamophobic flyers were found on the Western Washington University Campus. This is the third time in the last year that WWU has had flyers on the campus targeting communities of color. On the same day, stickers threatening Muslims were found in a government building bathroom in Portland, Oregon. A day later, on October 6, a Muslim owned store in Albuquerque, New Mexico was vandalized with the phrase “Kill em all.” Further, on October 7, a billboard for a local city council candidate in Raleigh, North Carolina,, Zainab Baloch, was vandalized with black graffiti stating “Sand N******” and “Trump.” Then two days later, on October 9, a mosque located in Farmville, Virginia had the words “F**K God & Allah” scrawled on its walls. These incidents of hate rhetoric and property damage demonstrate the spread of hate violence across the U.S. from the Southeast to the Northwest. The map below illustrates the spread of hate violence across the U.S. over the last two years using differentiating pins between incidents that occurred pre-election (orange pins) and post-election (purple pins).