AAPIs say, “Immigrants and Refugees Deserve Better than a Harmful Bill and a Fake National Emergency”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Fri­day, Feb­ru­ary 15, 2019

Wash­ing­ton, DC — The South­east Asia Resource Action Cen­ter (SEARAC), Nation­al Kore­an Amer­i­can Ser­vice & Edu­ca­tion Con­sor­tium (NAKASEC), and South Asian Amer­i­cans Lead­ing Togeth­er (SAALT) are grave­ly con­cerned by the steps tak­en last night by the Unit­ed States Con­gress and the pres­i­dent.

First, Asian Amer­i­can Pacif­ic Islander (AAPI) immi­grant fam­i­lies are deeply dis­ap­point­ed with the pas­sage of the Con­sol­i­dat­ed Appro­pri­a­tions Act of 2019 in both the House and Sen­ate yes­ter­day.

We under­stand the immense pres­sure that nego­tia­tors were under to pre­vent anoth­er gov­ern­ment shut­down. We sim­i­lar­ly need to keep our gov­ern­ment oper­at­ing. Nev­er­the­less, our orga­ni­za­tions are alarmed at the inclu­sion of $1.375 bil­lion for a phys­i­cal bar­ri­er (a total of 55 miles), an 11% increase in fund­ing for 45,274 Immi­gra­tion and Cus­toms Enforce­ment (ICE) deten­tion beds, and more enforce­ment agents. AAPI com­mu­ni­ties have made clear that any bill includ­ing any of these mea­sures is unac­cept­able. A full list of mea­sures that AAPI com­mu­ni­ties will not stand for can be found in this let­ter to con­gres­sion­al lead­ers.

Both the bor­der wall and the pres­ence of ICE are sources of ter­ror for all immi­grant com­mu­ni­ties. The wall is a sym­bol of hate for any immi­grant liv­ing with­in and out­side of the Unit­ed States, and it directs bil­lions of tax­pay­er dol­lars to sep­a­rat­ing fam­i­lies. Fur­ther­more, the bill does not place a lim­it on the num­ber of ICE deten­tion beds nor does it restrict the author­i­ty of the Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty from trans­fer­ring or repro­gram­ming fund­ing inter­nal­ly, which enables ICE to con­tin­ue expand­ing immi­grant incar­cer­a­tion and depor­ta­tion at will.

Sec­ond, Pres­i­dent Trump intends to declare a “nation­al emer­gency” at the bor­der in order to jus­ti­fy the need for his bor­der wall. Make no mis­take, there is no nation­al emer­gency hap­pen­ing at the bor­der. Rather, there is a human­i­tar­i­an cri­sis hap­pen­ing at the bor­der, and it is a cri­sis that Pres­i­dent Trump and his Admin­is­tra­tion caused in its entire­ty. The president’s inten­tion to declare a “nation­al emer­gency” is a uni­lat­er­al rebuke of our demo­c­ra­t­ic process dri­ven by an irra­tional desire to fund an anti-immi­grant unnec­es­sary, and unpop­u­lar bor­der wall after Con­gress would not approve the $5.7 bil­lion the pres­i­dent ini­tial­ly demand­ed. Two-thirds of Amer­i­cans do not sup­port a nation­al emer­gency.

Suman Raghu­nathan, exec­u­tive direc­tor of South Asian Amer­i­cans Lead­ing Togeth­er (SAALT), said:

“In just the last 10 days we’ve been hear­ing first­hand about the cru­el treat­ment towards nine South Asian men cur­rent­ly on hunger strike in a deten­tion facil­i­ty in El Paso. Despite their asy­lum requests, they’ve been sub­ject to vio­lent force-feed­ing, soli­tary con­fine­ment, and con­stant threats of depor­ta­tion.  What’s par­tic­u­lar­ly dev­as­tat­ing is that we’ve seen sim­i­lar treat­ment occur pre­vi­ous­ly in this same facil­i­ty and we have received accounts of abuse of detainees in sev­er­al facil­i­ties across the coun­try. This bill does noth­ing to address the sys­temic issues with our deten­tion sys­tem, and only serves to per­pet­u­ate abu­sive sit­u­a­tions like the ones we are wit­ness­ing now.”

Jonathan Paik, direc­tor of the Kore­an Resource Cen­ter, a NAKASEC affil­i­ate, stat­ed: “This is a reck­less move and endan­gers the future of our coun­try. Our democ­ra­cy is in incred­i­ble dan­ger- this is the true nation­al emer­gency. We call on all our fel­low Amer­i­cans to resist these abus­es of pow­er and reclaim our democ­ra­cy!”

Quyen Dinh, exec­u­tive direc­tor of SEARAC, expressed:

“The South­east Asian Amer­i­can refugee com­mu­ni­ty has been dev­as­tat­ed by the expan­sion of our deten­tion and depor­ta­tion sys­tem, and our fam­i­lies con­tin­ue to be torn apart at unprece­dent­ed rates. Our orga­ni­za­tions under­stand that this is a dif­fi­cult posi­tion for our pol­i­cy­mak­ers to be in, and none of them should be forced to make this choice. But our com­mu­ni­ties elect­ed our pol­i­cy­mak­ers to rep­re­sent our inter­ests, and Asian Amer­i­cans have declared in no uncer­tain terms that we oppose the pas­sage of this bill and the president’s uncon­sti­tu­tion­al and false­ly jus­ti­fied nation­al emer­gency. We remain vig­i­lant and com­mit­ted to work­ing with our Con­gres­sion­al part­ners to pro­tect the rights of our refugees and immi­grants.”

 

Con­tact: Sophia Qureshi | sophia@saalt.org | 202–997-4211

Dispatch from New Jersey: Town Hall and Legislative Visits!

In an effort to get the local South Asian com­mu­ni­ty engaged around immi­gra­tion reform, SAALT-NJ, along with com­mu­ni­ty part­ners, held a  ‘Town Hall for South Asians on Immi­gra­tion & Civ­il Rights’ in Jer­sey City on July 27th at the Five Cor­ners Library.   The event, part of the One Com­mu­ni­ty Unit­ed cam­paign, was the sec­ond in a series of com­mu­ni­ty forums that will be held nation­wide as a part of the cam­paign.

The town hall brought togeth­er not only a diverse group of folks with­in the com­mu­ni­ty, but also a diverse coali­tion of local com­mu­ni­ty part­ners, includ­ing: Amer­i­can Friends Ser­vice Com­mit­tee, Andolan, Asian Amer­i­can Legal Defense and Edu­ca­tion Fund, the Coun­cil on Amer­i­can-Islam­ic Rela­tions (CAIR-NJ), Govin­da San­skar Tem­ple, Man­avi, New Jer­sey Immi­grant Pol­i­cy Net­work, and the Sikh Coali­tion.

Although the focus of the dis­cus­sion at large was around immi­gra­tion reform, the con­ver­sa­tion cov­ered a vari­ety of issues, such as the effects of visa lim­i­ta­tions and back­logs on low-income work­ers and women fac­ing vio­lence in the home; and deten­tion cen­ters and the grow­ing num­ber of detained immi­grants. The con­ver­sa­tion was at once chal­leng­ing and emo­tion­al, as par­tic­i­pants shared per­son­al sto­ries illus­trat­ing how immi­gra­tion laws have neg­a­tive­ly impact­ed their lives and the lives of their loved ones.   Nev­er­the­less, the con­ver­sa­tion end­ed on a pos­i­tive note with ways to stay involved with the cam­paign, and to get more civi­cal­ly engaged around the immi­gra­tion reform con­ver­sa­tion.

In fact, on August 19th, SAALT mem­bers, along with coali­tion mem­bers from NJIPN and New Labor, con­duct­ed an in-dis­trict meet­ing with Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Don­ald Payne’s office in Newark, New Jer­sey.  Par­tic­i­pants met with a senior staff mem­ber at the Rep­re­sen­ta­tive’s office to dis­cuss issues around immi­gra­tion and health­care reform.

The del­e­ga­tion high­light­ed key con­cerns to both the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty and the immi­grant com­mu­ni­ty at large, such as (1) the increase in deten­tion and depor­ta­tions post 9–11 and its impact on immi­grant fam­i­lies in the US; (2) fam­i­ly- and employ­ment-based visa back­logs and the need for just and humane immi­gra­tion reform to pre­vent fam­i­lies from being torn apart in the process; and  (3) more con­crete mea­sures in place for immi­grant inte­gra­tion to address issues such as lin­guis­tic and cul­tur­al bar­ri­ers in access­ing ser­vices, and, as a result, becom­ing active and par­tic­i­pat­ing mem­bers of the com­mu­ni­ty.

The meet­ing was a great expe­ri­ence – it illus­trat­ed to the mem­bers present the sig­nif­i­cance of civic engage­ment, and how impor­tant it is to reach out to our respec­tive rep­re­sen­ta­tives about issues con­cern­ing us. In a polit­i­cal and eco­nom­ic cli­mate that seems so anti-immi­grant, it was cer­tain­ly refresh­ing to be able to sit down with the Rep­re­sen­ta­tive’s office to active­ly advo­cate for issues that deeply impact the immi­grant com­mu­ni­ty.  I look for­ward to meet­ing with oth­er local offices in the com­ing month and encour­age oth­ers to try to sched­ule meet­ings with your respec­tive Rep­re­sen­ta­tives while they are home for August recess.

To learn more about SAALT-NJ’s work, please email qudsia@saalt.org

Look­ing for ways to get involved? Here are some ideas:

• Call your mem­ber of Con­gress to express your sup­port for immi­gra­tion reform and strong civ­il rights poli­cies. Find out who your mem­ber of Con­gress is by vis­it­ing www.house.gov and www.senate.gov.

• The Cam­paign to Reform Immi­gra­tion for Amer­i­ca has launched a text mes­sag­ing cam­paign that sends alerts to par­tic­i­pants when a call to action, such as call­ing your Congressman/woman, is urgent­ly need­ed. To receive text mes­sage alerts, sim­ply text ‘jus­tice’ to 69866.

• Stay in touch with local and nation­al orga­ni­za­tions that work with the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty.

• Share your immi­gra­tion or civ­il rights sto­ry with SAALT by fill­ing out this form or send­ing an email to saalt@saalt.org.

Death in Detention: Tanveer Ahmad

Here’s a case for you to pon­der about. When you first read it, you might not think it that sym­pa­thet­ic. But, by the time you read the end of this post, maybe you’ll change your mind.

The New York Times recent­ly report­ed on the sto­ry of Tan­veer Ahmad. He came to New York City from Pak­istan on a vis­i­tor’s visa. In 1997, he was arrest­ed for pos­sess­ing an unli­censed gun. He mar­ried U.S. cit­i­zens and applied for mar­riage-based green cards to stay in this coun­try. His wife was threat­ened with mar­riage fraud alle­ga­tions by the gov­ern­ment. Immi­gra­tion author­i­ties lat­er caught him in 2005 for over­stay­ing his visa and detained him because of his gun offense. A few weeks lat­er, he died in deten­tion in New Jer­sey.

At first blush, you might be think­ing, “Hey, the gov­ern­ment should be going after these crim­i­nals! Why should I care that he got locked up and hap­pened to die?” After all, the lat­est buzz word with­in immi­gra­tion enforce­ment cir­cles is to go after “crim­i­nal aliens”, right? But dig a lit­tle deep­er into the facts — things aren’t quite that cut and dry.

What’s the most shock­ing about this case? Is it that Mr. Ahmad showed his gun while pre­vent­ing a rob­bery at the gas sta­tion where he worked the night shift and that had been held up 7 times in about a month? Is it that fol­low­ing 9/11 his U.S. cit­i­zen’s wife’s friends said, “You bet­ter watch it. You may be mar­ried to a ter­ror­ist,” caus­ing him to always watch his back? Is it that he was detained near­ly 10 years after his offense even though he paid the req­ui­site $200 fine for the mis­de­meanor? Is it that his arrest was con­sid­ered a “col­lat­er­al appre­hen­sion in Oper­a­tion Secure Com­mute” as part of the gov­ern­men­t’s sweep of immi­grants over­stay­ing visas fol­low­ing the 2005 ter­ror­ist attacks in Lon­don? Or is it that when he suf­fered a heart attack in deten­tion, the jail guard report­ed­ly blocked med­ical atten­tion for one hour, even after the jail received numer­ous pre­vi­ous com­plaints about detainee abuse and neglect?

I’ll leave it to you to decide. But remem­ber that our immi­gra­tion and deten­tion poli­cies can change to become more humane. In fact, there is a bill in Con­gress known as the Immi­gra­tion Over­sight and Fair­ness Act (H.R. 1215) pro­posed by Con­gress­woman Roy­bal-Allard of Cal­i­for­nia that would cod­i­fy deten­tion stan­dards and improve med­ical care for immi­grant detainees.  In my mind, such a case should not have come to this, but, sad­ly, it did. And we can let Con­gress know that through pol­i­cy reform, hope­ful­ly, they won’t hap­pen again.

(Check out this pre­vi­ous arti­cle in the NYT on this sto­ry, too.)

Daily Buzz 3.11.09

1. Bol­ly­wood hits col­lege cam­pus­es

2. Bob­by Jin­dal: Tak­ing Us Back­wards- A South Asian woman says “No thanks”

3. To go with the great Op-Ed in the Bal­ti­more Sun, anoth­er piece about how deten­tion and depor­ta­tion hurts immi­grant chil­dren

4. Dha­ka res­i­dent describes the BDR mutiny

5. Gam­bling and the Asian Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ty

Call out for Guest Bloggers in March for the SAALT Spot – FOCUS ON IMMIGRATION RAIDS AND DETENTION

SAALT wants to hear from activists and com­mu­ni­ty mem­bers about the rel­e­vant issues of the day through our blog, the SAALT Spot.

For the month of March, we are focus­ing on the top­ic of immi­gra­tion raids and deten­tion and their impact on the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty. You don’t need to be an immi­gra­tion expert; we are inter­est­ed in what peo­ple through­out the coun­try and com­mu­ni­ty are think­ing and talk­ing about.

Things you can con­sid­er when com­pos­ing a blog post:

-Immi­gra­tion enforce­ment has been on the rise in recent years and include both work­place and res­i­den­tial raids. In fact, a recent raid, the first since Pres­i­dent Barack Obama’s inau­gu­ra­tion, took place on Feb­ru­ary 24th in Belling­ham, WA, where 28 work­ers were arrest­ed by Immi­gra­tion and Cus­toms Enforce­ment at a engine man­u­fac­tur­ing plant.

-Immi­gra­tion raids tear fam­i­lies apart, often sep­a­rat­ing U.S. cit­i­zen chil­dren from their immi­grant par­ents.

-There are now approx­i­mate­ly 400 deten­tion and depor­ta­tion facil­i­ties all around the coun­try (an inter­ac­tive map can be found here).

-A group of the Indi­an guest work­ers who allege they were exploit­ed by their employ­er in the Gulf Coast and are engaged in a strug­gle for jus­tice were caught up in an immi­gra­tion work­place raid in North Dako­ta. 23 work­ers were arrest­ed dur­ing that raid.

- Oth­er sto­ries of South Asians in deten­tion and depor­ta­tion pro­ceed­ings like Har­vey Sachdev, a diag­nosed schiz­o­phrenic deport­ed to India who has since gone miss­ing

As the issue of work­place raids and immi­gra­tion deten­tion con­di­tions becomes the top­ic of Con­gres­sion­al leg­is­la­tion and con­ver­sa­tions around the coun­try, blog posts could focus on:

-How have immi­gra­tion enforce­ment pro­ce­dures affect­ed South Asians?

-What issues and pro­vi­sions should South Asians look for in gov­ern­ment leg­is­la­tion and poli­cies that address immi­gra­tion enforce­ment?

-How can the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty make our posi­tions heard around immi­gra­tion enforce­ment poli­cies?

Ide­al­ly, blog posts will be between 1–3 para­graphs and each guest-blog­ger will write 2–3 entries in the course of the month. If you want to link to inter­est­ing arti­cles or blog posts, please include them in the text of the com­po­si­tion. All entries should be emailed to mou@saalt.org on the Tues­day of each week in Feb­ru­ary that you can con­tribute. Entries may be edit­ed for length.

Mentally Ill Man with Open Case, Deported back to India 2 days After Obama Inaugurated, is Now Missing

This case came to our atten­tion through Dim­ple Rana at Deport­ed Dias­po­ra. In a trag­ic turn of event, Har­vey Sachdev, who has lived in the Unit­ed States for more than 40 years, was deport­ed to India even though his case is still open on appeal. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, Sachdev suf­fers from schiz­o­phre­nia and has been miss­ing since his arrival in New Del­hi. Read the press release about Sachde­v’s case below.

Want to do some­thing to to demand human rights for immi­grants who are in deten­tion and who reg­u­lar­ly face due process vio­la­tions? Take a minute to sign this peti­tion to Pres­i­dent Oba­ma encour­ag­ing him to con­sid­er these vio­la­tions as he staffs and restruc­tures the Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty (the Exec­u­tive agency that over­sees many key oper­a­tions includ­ing Immi­gra­tion and Cus­toms Enforce­ment) here <http://www.rightsworkinggroup.org/?q=DHSPetition>

PRESS RELEASE:
Men­tal­ly Ill Man with Open Case, Deport­ed 2 days After Oba­ma Inau­gu­rat­ed, is Now Miss­ing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednes­day, Jan­u­ary 28, 2009

For more infor­ma­tion, con­tact:
Neena Sachdev, nks29@cox.net
Greg Pleas­ants, JD/MSW, (213) 389‑2077, ext. 19, gpleasants@mhas-la.org
Dim­ple Rana, (781) 521‑4544, dimple.scorpio@gmail.com

Wash­ing­ton DC Area Fam­i­ly of Men­tal­ly Ill Man Fears for His Life as He is Miss­ing in India Fol­low­ing Depor­ta­tion
ICE exe­cutes depor­ta­tion of schiz­o­phrenic man on Jan­u­ary 22nd, despite his case still being under review, that he is the son, broth­er and father of U.S. cit­i­zens and that his depor­ta­tion could result in his death.

Wash­ing­ton D.C.  —  Jan­u­ary 28, 2009 — The Sachdev fam­i­ly is liv­ing a night­mare as Immi­gra­tion and Cus­toms Enforce­ment (ICE) deport­ed their fam­i­ly mem­ber, Har­vey Sachdev, to India on Jan­u­ary 22nd. Har­vey was a res­i­dent of the Unit­ed States for near­ly 40 years, and is diag­nosed with schiz­o­phre­nia. Har­vey is a son, a broth­er and a father of U.S. cit­i­zens. His case is still open on appeal before the Fourth Cir­cuit court. Nev­er­the­less ICE deport­ed him to India on Jan­u­ary 22nd, 2009.

The trau­ma of Har­vey’s pro­longed deten­tion and recent depor­ta­tion made him high­ly unsta­ble. He is now miss­ing in New Del­hi, India, a city of 11 mil­lion peo­ple. It is an unfa­mil­iar city to him, where he has no fam­i­ly and no access to med­ica­tion. Accord­ing to his broth­er and sis­ters, “Our broth­er’s depor­ta­tion is like­ly a death sen­tence for him, and we also fear our moth­er’s life. The stress and the wor­ry has put her life in per­il.”

Hav­ing pushed his depor­ta­tion date back sev­er­al times, ICE ini­tial­ly noti­fied the fam­i­ly of the sched­uled depor­ta­tion, but failed to con­firm it, so nec­es­sary arrange­ments could be made in India. After repeat­ed calls on the day of his depor­ta­tion, ICE only told the fam­i­ly he was no longer in deten­tion. The fam­i­ly also repeat­ed­ly attempt­ed to get con­fir­ma­tion from the India Con­sulate Offices and Embassy, which had to issue trav­el doc­u­ments, but received no infor­ma­tion.

Har­vey came to the U.S. with his par­ents at the age of twelve. He was vale­dic­to­ri­an of his high school and earned a schol­ar­ship to col­lege. Trag­i­cal­ly, in his late teens he devel­oped schiz­o­phre­nia and has bat­tled men­tal ill­ness for all of his adult life.

Due to his men­tal ill­ness, he was con­vict­ed of inap­pro­pri­ate and aber­rant but non-vio­lent crimes. The most seri­ous was inde­cent expo­sure, but he was not guilty of any phys­i­cal con­tact with any per­son, nor of any vio­lence. There is no indi­ca­tion that any court thought that the pun­ish­ment for his crimes should result in depor­ta­tion to a coun­try that he can’t remem­ber, where he has no friends or fam­i­ly or any con­nec­tion what­so­ev­er.

His par­ents and his fam­i­ly are U.S. cit­i­zens. Two of his fam­i­ly mem­bers are serv­ing in the mil­i­tary, with one com­plet­ing two tours of duty in Iraq. He mar­ried a U.S. cit­i­zen and has a U.S. cit­i­zen daugh­ter who is now twen­ty-two years old.

Mr. Sachdev is men­tal­ly ill and requires care, which his fam­i­ly is able and will­ing to pro­vide. He has no one in India and does not have the abil­i­ty to sur­vive on his own.

Greg Pleas­ants, JD/MSW, an Equal Jus­tice Works Fel­low and Staff Attor­ney at Men­tal Health Advo­ca­cy Ser­vices, Inc. states that “Peo­ple with men­tal and devel­op­men­tal dis­abil­i­ties who are deport­ed can also face a grave risk of harass­ment and even per­se­cu­tion in their home coun­tries — harass­ment and per­se­cu­tion based sole­ly on their dis­abil­i­ties.”

“With­out fam­i­ly or med­ical sup­port, depor­ta­tion can become a death sen­tence. Sui­cide and attempt­ed sui­cide are not uncom­mon among deport­ed peo­ple with men­tal ill­ness­es. Access to med­i­cine can be lim­it­ed and peo­ple are often deport­ed with­out any infor­ma­tion on their med­ical back­ground.  Depor­ta­tion of the men­tal­ly ill is cru­el and unusu­al pun­ish­ment,” says Dim­ple Rana of Deport­ed Dias­po­ra, an orga­ni­za­tion work­ing with peo­ple deport­ed from the U.S.

For more infor­ma­tion, con­tact:
Neena Sachdev — Har­vey Sachde­v’s sis­ter, nks29@cox.net
Greg Pleas­ants, JD/MSW — Equal Jus­tice Works Fel­low and Staff Attor­ney at Men­tal Health Advo­ca­cy Ser­vices, Inc. (213) 389‑2077 ext. 19, gpleasants@mhas-la.org
Dim­ple Rana, Co-Founder and Direc­tor, Deport­ed Dias­po­ra, (781) 521‑4544, dimple.scorpio@gmail.com

Night of 1,000 Conversations is here!

Tonight, “con­ver­sa­tions” (ie. gath­er­ings of peo­ple that meet to share sto­ries) are being held in com­mu­ni­ties across the coun­try. SAALT is excit­ed to be par­tic­i­pat­ing in one such con­ver­sa­tion being held in Wash­ing­ton, DC. The ulti­mate goal of A Night of 1,000 Con­ver­sa­tions is to get peo­ple talk­ing about how gov­ern­ment poli­cies affect the every­day lives of Amer­i­cans. The focus of the con­ver­sa­tion tonight (at the All Souls Church, Uni­tar­i­an near the Colum­bia Heights metro, for those of you in the DC area) is shar­ing the expe­ri­ences of dif­fer­ent immi­grant com­mu­ni­ties around poli­cies and issues like back­logs in the cit­i­zen­ship and nat­u­ral­iza­tion process; inhu­mane deten­tion and depor­ta­tion pro­ce­dures; home and work­place raids and more. SAALT is work­ing with All Souls Uni­tar­i­an Social Jus­tice Min­istries, Amer­i­can Arab Anti-Dis­crim­i­na­tion Com­mit­tee, CASA de Mary­land, Vir­ginia New Major­i­ty and Rights Work­ing Group to orga­nize this con­ver­sa­tion and we wel­come any­one in the Wash­ing­ton, DC area to attend. The event goes from 6:30pm — 9:00pm and begins with iftar/dinner and includes a pan­el dis­cus­sion with experts and affect­ed com­mu­ni­ty mem­bers fol­lowed by small group dis­cus­sions. One of the fea­tured pan­elists is jour­nal­ist Laila Al-Ari­an, the author of Col­lat­er­al Dam­age, who will dis­cuss the deten­tion of her father, Sami Al-Ari­an. If you would like to attend this event, please join us! The iftar and remarks will begin prompt­ly at 6:30pm.

Map of loca­tion

Fly­er for Night of 1,000 Con­ver­sa­tionsTo learn more about Night of 1,000 Con­ver­sa­tions, vis­it www.nightof1,000conversations.org 

 

. (This web­site also lists con­ver­sa­tions hap­pen­ing in oth­er loca­tions around the coun­try.)