Resources on Reproductive Injustice as Structural Hate Violence

SAALT launches new hate violence project

Hearing, Mapping, and Contextualizing: How South Asian, Muslim, Sikh, and South West Asian (SAMSSWA) Hate Violence Survivors Perceive Healing and Justice 

Our new approach to hate vio­lence, launched in 2022, is to enable the par­tic­i­pa­tion and lead­er­ship of hate vio­lence sur­vivors by think­ing out­side con­ven­tion­al par­a­digms of heal­ing and jus­tice, often tied to pol­i­cy and law enforce­ment. Instead, we will offer trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice (TJ) as a modal­i­ty of healing.

We will select 15 sur­vivors affect­ed by inter­per­son­al and struc­tur­al hate crimes—including but not lim­it­ed to ones dri­ven by racism, Islam­o­pho­bia, casteism, col­orism, gen­der, sex­u­al­i­ty, immi­gra­tion sta­tus, phys­i­cal and men­tal abil­i­ty, and a his­to­ry of carcerality—both at the hands of unknown attack­ers (e.g., gen­dered Islam­o­pho­bia, harass­ment and vio­lence in pub­lic spaces, van­dal­ism and prop­er­ty destruc­tion, and dox­ing and oth­er forms of dig­i­tal vio­lence) and at the hands of known attack­ers (e.g., gen­der-based and domes­tic vio­lence, child abuse, and insti­tu­tion­al dis­crim­i­na­tion in work­places, health and edu­ca­tion settings).

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SAALT launches new hate violence project

Hearing, Mapping, and Contextualizing: How South Asian, Muslim, Sikh, and South West Asian (SAMSSWA) Hate Violence Survivors Perceive Healing and Justice

Why a new approach to addressing hate violence?

Since our for­ma­tion in 2001, SAALT has his­tor­i­cal­ly approached our work around end­ing hate vio­lence as a pol­i­cy- and doc­u­men­ta­tion-dri­ven insti­tu­tion, mean­ing that our efforts have been focused on col­lect­ing data on hate vio­lence impact­ing our com­mu­ni­ty and advo­cat­ing for fed­er­al hate crime leg­is­la­tion to rec­og­nize and pros­e­cute per­pe­tra­tors of indi­vid­ual inci­dents. After two decades we face the real­i­ty that hate vio­lence against com­mu­ni­ties of col­or has not decreased. And, that is because the root caus­es of this vio­lence are tied to the very poli­cies of the gov­ern­ment from which we kept seek­ing recourse. As a result, we find it urgent and imper­a­tive to engage in a more direct, sur­vivor-cen­tered way that is not just short-term reform, but heal­ing and trans­for­ma­tive over the long-term. 

We are liv­ing in a water­shed moment, with great poten­tial for both hope and harm. Hate vio­lence has surged in America—from police bru­tal­i­ty against Black Amer­i­cans to the attacks tar­get­ing East Asian Amer­i­cans and those racial­ized as East Asian. Fight­ing hate vio­lence is vital—now more than ever—and the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty must build coali­tions with oth­er com­mu­ni­ties of color. 

Our new approach to hate vio­lence, launched in 2022, is to enable the par­tic­i­pa­tion and lead­er­ship of hate vio­lence sur­vivors by think­ing out­side con­ven­tion­al par­a­digms of heal­ing and jus­tice, often tied to pol­i­cy and law enforce­ment. Instead, we will offer trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice (TJ) as a modal­i­ty of heal­ing. We must be com­mit­ted to hon­or­ing and uplift­ing the inter­re­lat­ed prax­es of abo­li­tion and trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice in Black and Indige­nous com­mu­ni­ties as well as the lead­er­ship of BIPOC folks, many of whom iden­ti­fy as LGBTQI+, in shap­ing abo­li­tion and trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice over the cen­turies, includ­ing those at Project NIA, INCITE!, Bay Area Trans­for­ma­tive Jus­tice Col­lec­tive, Gen­er­a­tionFIVE, Cre­ative Inter­ven­tions, Inter­rupt­ing Crim­i­nal­iza­tion, and Sur­vived & Punished. 

Such prax­es and lead­er­ship arise from America’s very found­ing being premised upon—and defined by—hate vio­lence. The cre­ation and per­pet­u­a­tion of Amer­i­can sys­tems and insti­tu­tions were pred­i­cat­ed both on the dis­place­ment and geno­cide of Indige­nous peo­ple and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Such sys­temic vio­lence root­ed in hatred thus formed the basis and roots of carcer­al ide­ol­o­gy, with racist xeno­pho­bia serv­ing as the pri­ma­ry sen­ti­ment. Trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice, with roots in end­ing child sex­u­al abuse, asks, as Mia Min­gus writes: “What kinds of com­mu­ni­ty infra­struc­ture can we cre­ate to sup­port more safe­ty, trans­paren­cy, sus­tain­abil­i­ty, care and con­nec­tion?” and “What do sur­vivors need?” We aspire to dis­cuss trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice with sur­vivors and then go to the next lev­el by active­ly visu­al­iz­ing a TJ-led com­mu­ni­ty, with the vir­tu­al hang­outs over food, work­shops, inter­views, and an in-per­son heal­ing ses­sion serv­ing as safe and pow­er­ful alter­na­tive out­lets of heal­ing, expres­sion, and needs.

Methodology

We will select 15 sur­vivors affect­ed by inter­per­son­al and struc­tur­al hate crimes—including but not lim­it­ed to ones dri­ven by racism, Islam­o­pho­bia, casteism, col­orism, gen­der, sex­u­al­i­ty, immi­gra­tion sta­tus, phys­i­cal and men­tal abil­i­ty, and a his­to­ry of carcerality—both at the hands of unknown attack­ers (e.g., gen­dered Islam­o­pho­bia, harass­ment and vio­lence in pub­lic spaces, van­dal­ism and prop­er­ty destruc­tion, and dox­ing and oth­er forms of dig­i­tal vio­lence) and at the hands of known attack­ers (e.g., gen­der-based and domes­tic vio­lence, child abuse, and insti­tu­tion­al dis­crim­i­na­tion in work­places, health and edu­ca­tion settings).

We are orga­niz­ing dis­cus­sions with our Nation­al Coali­tion of South Asian Orga­ni­za­tions (NCSO) part­ners and oth­er South Asian orga­ni­za­tions and indi­vid­u­als who direct­ly work with sur­vivors and learn­ing from their work, ask­ing them to col­lab­o­rate on the project as work­shop facil­i­ta­tors, and iden­ti­fy­ing sur­vivors in their net­works who would be eager and inspired to par­take in this project. By con­nect­ing and engag­ing in a rec­i­p­ro­cal rela­tion­ship with these orga­ni­za­tions, we hope to build with and uni­fy the NCSO and our larg­er community—another one of our project goals, as exhib­it­ed by the work­shop facil­i­ta­tors we will invite. 

Timeline

This project will have six mov­ing parts from Sep­tem­ber 2022 to August/September/October 2023 in the fol­low­ing order: 

  • (1) an ini­tial pre-inter­view between the Heal­ing & Jus­tice Researcher and the sur­vivors, 1:1, on form­ing rela­tion­ships, likes and dis­likes, etc., to estab­lish a rela­tion­ship filled with trust, mutu­al dig­ni­ty, reci­procity, agency, and familiarity
  • (2) an online demo­graph­ic ques­tion­naire that will allow our researcher to cre­ate small groups dur­ing the in-per­son heal­ing ses­sion based on answer and iden­ti­ty align­ment and to dis­ag­gre­gate the data
  • (3) six vir­tu­al hang­outs for the 15 sur­vivors to bond over food, to pre­emp­tive­ly set up the sur­vivor net­work that will sus­tain this project. The last vir­tu­al hang­out in August/September/October 2023 will serve as a reflec­tion ses­sion on the project and its process. 
  • (4) back-and-forth between 13 work­shops and (5) 10 1:1 semi-struc­tured inter­views with our researcher. These work­shops, which will also help build coali­tions by includ­ing speak­ers from with­in and beyond the NCSO (e.g., Sikh Coali­tion, Jen­ny Bhatt, Sur­vived & Pun­ished), will pro­vide the back­ground infor­ma­tion nec­es­sary to devel­op­ing sur­vivors’ informed per­spec­tives on hate crime leg­is­la­tion, restora­tive and trans­for­ma­tive jus­tice, police reform, etc. 
    • Two of these workshops—one, on what is heal­ing and two, on what is justice—will be survivor-led. 
    • Detailed, safe, and inno­v­a­tive inter­views will help iden­ti­fy per­spec­tives on the police, hate crime leg­is­la­tion, and alter­na­tives to the police such as trans­for­ma­tive and heal­ing jus­tice. They will explore access to heal­ing path­ways, such as pos­i­tive and mal­adap­tive cop­ing skills, com­mu­ni­ty sup­port, men­tal and phys­i­cal health ser­vices. Sur­vivors will offer their per­spec­tives on jus­tice, such as police involve­ment in their cas­es, access to resti­tu­tion struc­tures such as restora­tive jus­tice cir­cles and vic­tim-com­pen­sa­tion funds, and def­i­n­i­tions of fair­ness, safe­ty, and account­abil­i­ty. They will express their thoughts and needs on relat­ed issues such as gun con­trol, edu­ca­tion­al reform, food jus­tice, and eco­nom­ic security. 
    • Our Heal­ing and Jus­tice Researcher wrote the sur­vey and inter­view ques­tion­naires and con­sult­ed 50 schol­ars, orga­ni­za­tions, and heal­ing prac­ti­tion­ers (e.g., Restora­tive Jus­tice for Oak­land Youth, South Asian Sex­u­al and Men­tal Health Alliance, and Puni Kalra, founder of the Sikh Heal­ing Col­lec­tive fol­low­ing the Oak Creek shoot­ing) both inside and beyond the NCSO in the process for feed­back. An excerpt of the ques­tion­naires can be found here.
  • (6) We will hold an in-per­son week­end ses­sion in July 2023 to max­i­mize heal­ing. Sur­vivors will spend the first day engag­ing in activ­i­ties offered by our Somat­ics Con­sul­tant; cre­ate some­thing of their choice (e.g., a meal, song, dance, gar­den, cloth­ing); and close the day with activ­i­ties offered by our Heal­ing Jus­tice Con­sul­tant. The sec­ond day, sur­vivors will engage in activ­i­ties offered by our Somat­ics Con­sul­tant and a sto­ry­telling cir­cle facil­i­tat­ed by our Restora­tive Jus­tice Facil­i­ta­tor as well as map out a future world (What does it con­sist of? What makes it safe, fair, and just?) with the help of our Trans­for­ma­tive Jus­tice Facilitator.

Why now? 

We will har­ness the pow­er of speak­ing and lis­ten­ing. Greater infor­ma­tion, freer par­tic­i­pa­tion and informed analy­sis, par­tic­u­lar­ly in rela­tion to anti-Black racism in the US, will help us devel­op a shared lan­guage for change togeth­er with our NCSO and beyond. We will present our find­ings from the sur­veys and inter­views, and make rec­om­men­da­tions for com­mu­ni­ty-based advo­ca­cy orga­ni­za­tions, men­tal health and legal pro­fes­sion­als, TJ prac­ti­tion­ers, and gov­ern­ment offi­cials through a pub­lic, inter­ac­tive web­site with mul­ti­ple purposes—a toolk­it, mem­oir, report, doc­u­ment, and historiography. 

We will also be offer­ing the fol­low­ing ser­vices and com­pen­sa­tions: (1) an infor­ma­tion and informed con­sent form empha­siz­ing con­sent (i.e., vol­un­tary and selec­tive par­tic­i­pa­tion), con­fi­den­tial­i­ty, anonymi­ty, and full veto pow­er over writ­ten con­tent; (2) $2,500 com­pen­sa­tion to each sur­vivor as an expres­sion of our grat­i­tude for their time, com­mit­ment, and fullest selves; (3) indi­vid­ual and group coach­ing ses­sions with a Licensed Clin­i­cal Psy­chol­o­gist; (4) local­ized resource sheets (e.g., con­tacts to faith-based lead­ers); (5) somat­ic and heal­ing jus­tice activ­i­ties; (6) trans­la­tion and inter­pre­ta­tion sup­port; (7) a reflec­tion cir­cle and sur­vey on the process at the last vir­tu­al hang­out; and (8) a sur­vivor-led net­work out­liv­ing and out­last­ing the project. 

This project has numer­ous impli­ca­tions. Fol­low­ing the schol­ar­ly inter­est in and debate over the effi­ca­cy of Brazil and India’s all-women police sta­tions in address­ing gen­der-based vio­lence and lis­ten­ing to sur­vivors, our insights might well be extrap­o­lat­ed to the crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tems of oth­er nations and inspire glob­al models. 

Hate vio­lence takes too many lives every day. We rec­og­nize the urgency of a response, and this project, with its demo­c­ra­t­ic ways of sto­ry­telling cen­tered on a just tran­si­tion, or “a vision-led, uni­fy­ing and place-based set of prin­ci­ples, process­es, and prac­tices that build eco­nom­ic and polit­i­cal pow­er to shift from an extrac­tive econ­o­my to a regen­er­a­tive economy”—is our contribution. 

This project will con­tribute to the trans­for­ma­tion of jus­tice for indi­vid­u­als and com­mu­ni­ties. It will expand the notion of jus­tice from sim­ply one sur­vivor going to the gov­ern­ment for help, to one where an entire soci­ety is deeply aware of struc­tur­al vio­lence and injus­tice, and open to form­ing new and more equi­table method­olo­gies and institutions. 

This mul­ti­lay­ered project will involve a rec­i­p­ro­cal rela­tion­ship with par­tic­i­pants, in which we will uncov­er our deep­est, truest selves. We will share our stories—the way in which we are sto­ried, unsto­ried and resto­ried. We will dream of rad­i­cal­ly new worlds. And through this indi­vid­ual and col­lec­tive work, we will devel­op a roadmap for rad­i­cal heal­ing and justice.

Ways to get involved

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South Asian American Organizations Condemn Violence in Delhi

As mem­bers of South Asian orga­ni­za­tions in the U.S. that believe in the val­ues of dig­ni­ty, jus­tice and inclu­sion for all, we are hor­ri­fied by the vio­lence tar­get­ing Indi­an Mus­lims in Del­hi this week.  Since Sun­day, at least 40 peo­ple have been killed and hun­dreds more injured. We are struck by the heart wrench­ing footage of Mus­lims flee­ing their homes, stores and homes burnt to ash­es, the des­e­cra­tion of mosques and vio­lent attacks by mobs on Mus­lim communities.

What is most alarm­ing is the role of the police in incit­ing the vio­lence and the speech of a local politi­cian from the Hin­du nation­al­ist BJP par­ty warn­ing pro­tes­tors of the bru­tal­i­ty  that would be unleashed on them if they failed to clear the streets before Trump’s vis­it. This is state sanc­tioned vio­lence, as chief offi­cers of the Del­hi police stood behind him in solidarity.

 As mem­bers of the Dias­po­ra we can­not be silent.

These events are hor­ri­fy­ing. And dis­turbing­ly, they are not entire­ly unex­pect­ed.  They come after a series of exclu­sion­ary and unjust actions tar­get­ing reli­gious and caste minori­ties and vul­ner­a­ble pop­u­la­tions, par­tic­u­lar­ly since the re-elec­tion of Modi. 

There have been wide scale protests through­out India since the gov­ern­ment passed the inher­ent­ly dis­crim­i­na­to­ry Cit­i­zen­ship Amend­ment Act, which active­ly cre­ates an uncon­sti­tu­tion­al, reli­gion-based cri­te­ria to grant cit­i­zen­ship to select immi­grants and lays the legal foun­da­tion to denat­u­ral­ize mil­lions of Indi­an minori­ties, effec­tive­ly cre­at­ing the largest net­work of con­cen­tra­tion camps in the world. The CAA, in con­junc­tion with the Nation­al Reg­is­tra­tion of Cit­i­zens (NRC) list, effec­tive­ly ren­ders India’s 200 mil­lion Mus­lims state­less

In Kash­mir, Indi­a’s ongo­ing mil­i­tary occu­pa­tion has inten­si­fied since August 5th, when com­mu­ni­ca­tions were cut and the region was placed under an intense crack­down. The Indi­an state has effec­tive­ly silenced Kash­miris and detained thou­sands of peo­ple includ­ing minors and many Kash­miris fear a set­tler-colo­nial project that would change the demo­graph­ics of the region from a Mus­lim-major­i­ty state to a Hin­du-major­i­ty state.

And across the coun­try, there has been a surge in the num­ber of lynch­ings of minori­ties, most­ly Mus­lims, Dal­its and Chris­tians, under Modi’s leadership.

The Modi gov­ern­ment is imple­ment­ing a Hin­du nation­al­ist agen­da, known as Hin­dut­va, or right wing Hin­du nation­al­ism, which is root­ed in the alarm­ing notion that Hin­dus are racial­ly and cul­tur­al­ly supe­ri­or to oth­ers. Sim­i­lar to white suprema­cy, which South Asians (includ­ing Hin­dus) in the Unit­ed States con­tend reg­u­lar­ly with, Hin­dut­va threat­ens the rights, bod­ies, free­doms, and liveli­hoods of non-Hin­dus in India. 

These suprema­cist ide­olo­gies implic­it­ly and explic­it­ly sanc­tion hate — and put our com­mu­ni­ties in dan­ger- both in the U.S. and in the sub­con­ti­nent.  SAALT has doc­u­ment­ed more than 542 inci­dents of hate vio­lence in the U.S. tar­get­ing Mus­lims and those racial­ized as Mus­lim since Novem­ber 2015. 

The cur­rent sit­u­a­tion in India, fueled by nation­al­ism and Hin­dut­va, has glob­al impli­ca­tions. Over the past five years there has been a dra­mat­ic increase in the num­ber of Indi­an nation­als seek­ing asy­lum in the U.S. Peo­ple seek­ing asy­lum from per­se­cu­tion range from Sikh polit­i­cal activists to reli­gious minori­ties to those fac­ing caste oppres­sion. The anti-Mus­lim mea­sures in India are a part of a tide of ris­ing Islam­o­pho­bia, and comes as the Trump Admin­is­ra­tion just expand­ed its own Mus­lim Ban.

As South Asian orga­ni­za­tions work­ing toward build­ing pow­er and capac­i­ty with our com­mu­ni­ties, we urge all South Asian Amer­i­cans to under­stand the con­nec­tions between white suprema­cy and Hin­dut­va, to unite around human rights, to sup­port poli­cies that uphold dig­ni­ty and inclu­sion for all, and to denounce hate vio­lence in all its forms. 

We urge South Asians to: ask their Mem­bers of Con­gress to join Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Bey­er, Raskin, Omar, Cas­tro, Tlaib, and Jaya­pal; and Sen­a­tors Sanders and War­ren in con­demn­ing the vio­lence tar­get­ing Indi­an Mus­lims, caste oppressed com­mu­ni­ties and Kash­miris (includ­ing co-spon­sor­ing House Res­o­lu­tion 745); to edu­cate them­selves and their own com­mu­ni­ties about the impli­ca­tions and impacts of Hin­dut­va; and show up to the protests at Indi­an con­sulates on Feb­ru­ary 28th and orga­nize their per­son­al net­works, tem­ples, and cul­tur­al insti­tu­tions to defund hate and stop sup­port­ing the BJP and RSS now. The time to stop geno­cide is now. 

Signed,

South Asian Amer­i­cans Lead­ing Togeth­er (SAALT)

Indi­an Amer­i­can Mus­lim Coun­cil (IAMC)

Equal­i­ty Labs 

Stand with Kashmir

Hin­dus for Human Rights (HfHR)

Sad­hana: Coali­tion of Pro­gres­sive Hindus 

DesiQ Dias­po­ra (DQD)

Sakhi for South Asian Women

South Asia Sol­i­dar­i­ty Initiative

Stu­dents Against Hin­dut­va (SAH)

Atlanta Kash­miri Community

Alliance of South Asians Tak­ing Action

Burmese Rohingya Com­mu­ni­ty of Georgia 

The Sikh Coalition 

Coun­cil Of Peo­ples Organization 

API Chaya

Desis Ris­ing Up and Mov­ing (DRUM)

South Asians Build­ing Account­abil­i­ty & Heal­ing (SABAH)

India Home

Sikh Amer­i­can Legal Defense and Edu­ca­tion Fund (SALDEF)

Chhaya CDC

Coali­tion of Seat­tle Indi­an-Amer­i­cans (CSIA)

South Asian Work­ers’ Cen­ter — Boston

Nation­al Queer Asian Pacif­ic Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

Jakara Move­ment

Adhikaar

South Asian Youth in Hous­ton Unite (SAYHU)

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Administration Acts on Threat to Expand Muslim Ban

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jan­u­ary 31, 2020

Ear­li­er today, just days after the third anniver­sary of the Mus­lim Ban, the Trump Admin­is­tra­tion struck again by adding six more coun­tries to this racist pol­i­cy. Nation­als of Myan­mar, Nige­ria, Kyr­gyzs­tan and Eritrea will be banned from seek­ing immi­grant visas and nation­als of Sudan and Tan­za­nia will be banned from the diver­si­ty visa lot­tery. While it is expect­ed that Nige­ri­ans will be most impact­ed in num­ber, it is also painful to see that Mus­lim refugees flee­ing geno­cide in Myan­mar will be turned away by our nation just as Jew­ish refugees were decades ago dur­ing the Holocaust.

“One thing is clear, the Mus­lim Ban was this administration’s first fam­i­ly sep­a­ra­tion pol­i­cy just days after the pres­i­den­tial inau­gu­ra­tion in 2017, and it has served as the foun­da­tion­al pol­i­cy for tar­get­ing com­mu­ni­ties of col­or ever since. Since then, we have seen attacks on DACA, TPS, diver­si­ty lot­tery, green cards, pub­lic ben­e­fits, refugees, asy­lum seek­ers, preg­nant women, and more to insti­tu­tion­al­ize a white suprema­cist agen­da,” said Lak­sh­mi Sri­daran, SAALT’s Inter­im Exec­u­tive Director.

Since Jan­u­ary of 2017, SAALT has doc­u­ment­ed an uptick in white suprema­cist hate vio­lence aimed at Mus­lims and those racial­ized as Mus­lim, includ­ing 350 inci­dents of hate and 200 instances of xeno­pho­bic or Islam­o­pho­bic rhetoric from media out­lets and elect­ed offi­cials. SAALT’s 2018 report “Com­mu­ni­ties on Fire” found that Mus­lim women wear­ing hijab and indi­vid­u­als with dark­er skin col­or were more fre­quent­ly the tar­gets of the most vio­lent acts of hate. This runs par­al­lel to today’s expan­sion of the Mus­lim Ban tar­get­ing Mus­lim major­i­ty African nations.

Con­gress has the pow­er to end all of this by pass­ing the NO BAN Act. This leg­is­la­tion would imme­di­ate­ly rescind the Mus­lim Ban and lim­it the exec­u­tive branch’s author­i­ty to exer­cise such wide and unchecked dis­cre­tion in issu­ing racist poli­cies. Today’s expan­sion of the Mus­lim Ban under­scores the need to pass a clean NO BAN Act with zero excep­tions because even the small­est open­ing can unleash such wide­spread destruction.

Con­tact: sophia@saalt.org
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On Third Anniversary of Muslim Ban, Asian American Organizations Say Pass NO BAN Act

Image

Wash­ing­ton, DC – Three years ago today, the Trump Admin­is­tra­tion placed a trav­el ban on sev­er­al Mus­lim-major­i­ty nations that has con­tin­ued to sep­a­rate and dis­place thou­sands of Mus­lim fam­i­lies in the Unit­ed States. The impact of the ban has also pre­vent­ed indi­vid­u­als from access­ing med­ical treat­ment, along with edu­ca­tion­al and pro­fes­sion­al opportunities.

To coun­ter­act the Mus­lim Ban, Con­gress­woman Judy Chu intro­duced the NO BAN Act last year, which would end this ban and any oth­er bans based on religous dis­crim­i­na­tion. This year, as the White House threat­ens to expand the Mus­lim Ban to include an addi­tion­al sev­en coun­tries to the list, we stand unit­ed in urg­ing Con­gress to pass H.R. 2214 NO BAN Act to ensure the Trump Administration’s agen­da of dis­crim­i­na­tion can go no further.

Becky Bel­core, Direc­tor of NAKASEC, said:

To deny entry into the Unit­ed States based on reli­gious affil­i­a­tion or racial iden­ti­ty is racist and dis­crim­i­na­to­ry. Trump’s first iter­a­tion of the Mus­lim Ban sin­gu­lar­ly tar­get­ed Mus­lim major­i­ty coun­tries. This rumored expan­sion strikes at main­ly non-white major­i­ty coun­tries. Trump’s insti­tu­tion of the Mus­lim Ban is couched in moral bank­rupt­cy, Islam­o­pho­bia, and White Suprema­cy. We as a soci­ety and com­mu­ni­ty must do bet­ter. We must reject these racist, anti-Mus­lim poli­cies and ensure that such bans can nev­er exist by pass­ing the NO BAN Act!

Lak­sh­mi Sri­daran, Inter­im Exec­u­tive Direc­tor of SAALT, said:

Insti­tu­tion­al­ized racism like the Mus­lim Ban has not only direct­ly impact­ed thou­sands of Mus­lims whose lives were torn apart because of this racist ban, but it has embold­ened white suprema­cists, sanc­tion­ing their vio­lence aimed at black and brown com­mu­ni­ties. Since the Mus­lim Ban was announced, we have tracked at least 350 inci­dents of hate vio­lence tar­get­ing Mus­lims and those racial­ized as Mus­lims, and 200 instances of xeno­pho­bic and/or Islam­o­pho­bic rhetoric from media and elect­ed offi­cials. As this Admin­is­tra­tion threat­ens to expand the destruc­tive Mus­lim Ban and issue addi­tion­al bans on preg­nant women and immi­grants with­out health insur­ance, we must stop this from going any fur­ther by demand­ing Con­gress pass the NO BAN Act imme­di­ate­ly.

Quyen Dinh, exec­u­tive direc­tor of the SEARAC, said:

South­east Asian Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ties remain stead­fast in our sup­port of Mus­lim Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ties and con­tin­ue to denounce the Mus­lim Ban. We must pro­tect the integri­ty of our immi­gra­tion sys­tem by fight­ing against dis­crim­i­na­tion and intol­er­ence with equi­ty and jus­tice. We stand with the Asian Amer­i­can and immi­grant rights com­mu­ni­ty by call­ing on Con­gress to pass the NO BAN Act to pre­vent fur­ther bias­es in our laws and ensure that com­mu­ni­ties across the coun­try can con­tin­ue to reunite with their loved ones.”

Con­tacts
Sam Yu, NAKASEC
syu@nakasec.org / 213–703-0992

Sophia Qureshi, SAALT
sophia@saalt.com / 202–997-4211

Elaine Sanchez Wil­son, SEARAC
elaine@searac.org / 202–601-2970

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FBI Releases 2018 Hate Crimes Report: Hate in the U.S. is getting deadlier

Novem­ber 12, 2019

Wash­ing­ton, D.C.: The Fed­er­al Bureau of Inves­ti­ga­tion (FBI) released its annu­al hate crimes report for 2018 ear­ly this morn­ing. The report doc­u­ment­ed 7,120 hate inci­dents in 2018, down slight­ly from 7,175 in 2017. Despite the minor decrease, hate vio­lence was more dead­ly and vio­lent than it has been since the surge of vio­lence against com­mu­ni­ties after the Sep­tem­ber 11th attacks in 2001.

Major find­ings of the report:

  • 2018 was the deadliest and most violent year for hate since 2001. There were 24 hate crime relat­ed deaths and 3,099 vio­lent crime offens­es in 2018.
  • Hate crimes towards Sikhs in the U.S. TRIPLED from 20 inci­dents in 2017 to 60 inci­dents in 2018.
  • There were 82 Anti-Arab hate crimes recorded in 2018 -  the second-highest total since the FBI added an anti-Arab category in 2015.
  • There were 188 anti-Muslim hate crimes recorded, down slight­ly from last year but the fifth-highest total on record.
  • There were 14 anti-Hindu hate crimes record­ed in 2018 — down from 15 in 2017.
  • Of the known offenders, over 50% identified as white​ 

Data col­lec­tion and under­re­port­ing of hate vio­lence remains a sig­nif­i­cant prob­lem. The Fed­er­al Bureau of Jus­tice Sta­tis­tics reports an aver­age of 250,000 hate crimes every year in the U.S. That’s 35 times more than what the FBI doc­u­ment­ed in 2018. Only 13% of the over 16,000 par­tic­i­pat­ing law enforce­ment agen­cies report­ed any hate crimes in their juris­dic­tions. Dis­turbing­ly, the mur­ders of Khalid Jabara, Srini­vas Kuchib­hot­la, and Heather Hey­er in 2016 and 2017, like so many oth­er hate crimes, have not been includ­ed in offi­cial FBI sta­tis­tics. The vast major­i­ty of crimes are going unreported.

And as we saw in 2017, white suprema­cy con­tin­ues to be a pri­ma­ry moti­va­tion behind hate vio­lence in the US. In both 2017 and 2018, over 50% of known offend­ers of report­ed hate crimes iden­ti­fied as white.

Of the over 500 inci­dents of hate vio­lence tar­get­ing South Asians, Mus­lims, Sikhs, Hin­dus, Mid­dle East­ern, and Arab Amer­i­cans thatSAALT has doc­u­ment­ed since Novem­ber 2016, at least 80% have been moti­vat­ed by anti-Mus­lim sen­ti­ment. In SAALT’s 2018 report “Com­mu­ni­ties on Fire,” one in every five per­pe­tra­tors of hate vio­lence ref­er­enced Pres­i­dent Trump, a Trump admin­is­tra­tion pol­i­cy, or Trump cam­paign slogan.

White suprema­cist vio­lence, fanned by the flames of racist rhetoric and poli­cies at the fed­er­al lev­el like the Mus­lim Ban and fam­i­ly sep­a­ra­tion, con­tin­ues to dev­as­tate Black and brown com­mu­ni­ties. Anti-Black hate crimes account­ed for more than 25% of vio­lent hate crimes report­ed in 2018 and the major­i­ty of inci­dents moti­vat­ed by race.

The cur­rent Admin­is­tra­tion con­tin­ues to pro­mote rather than address the root caus­es of this vio­lence. Com­pre­hen­sive data col­lec­tion is a crit­i­cal com­po­nent of doc­u­ment­ing the prob­lem, but acknowl­edg­ing and active­ly com­bat­ing white suprema­cy is the most impor­tant step to ensur­ing this vio­lence does­n’t con­tin­ue to wreak hav­oc on peo­ple’s lives.

Con­tact: sophia@saalt.org

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SAALT Statement on 18th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sep­tem­ber 11, 2019 

Today, 18 years after Sep­tem­ber 11, 2001, we mourn the lives lost that day, and the thou­sands who were and con­tin­ue to be vio­lent­ly tar­get­ed in the ensu­ing “War on Terror.”

Just four days after 9/11, Bal­bir Singh Sod­hi, a Sikh busi­ness own­er, was plant­i­ng flow­ers out­side of his gas sta­tion in Mesa, Ari­zona when he was shot and killed.  We lat­er learned that his shoot­er had report­ed­ly told a wait­ress at Apple­bees “I’m going to go out and shoot some tow­el heads,” and “We should kill their chil­dren, too, because they’ll grow up to be like their par­ents.” This was the first of 645 inci­dents of vio­lent back­lash aimed at South Asian, Mus­lim, Sikh, Hin­du, Mid­dle East­ern, and Arab Amer­i­cans in just that first week after 9/11.

Over the last two decades, the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment has enact­ed poli­cies repeat­ed­ly jus­ti­fy­ing the racial pro­fil­ing of South Asian, Mus­lim, and Arab Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ties and those racial­ized as such. This includes the very cre­ation of the Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty, the Patri­ot Act, the Nation­al Secu­ri­ty Entry-Exit Reg­is­tra­tion Sys­tem, Coun­ter­ing Vio­lent Extrem­ism, and the Mus­lim Ban to name a few.  These state sanc­tioned poli­cies were his­tor­i­cal­ly per­fect­ed on the backs of oth­er com­mu­ni­ties of col­or, and we can­not sep­a­rate them from the con­tin­ued vio­lence our com­mu­ni­ties face from orga­nized white suprema­cist action. 

Ear­li­er this year, a white suprema­cist killed 51 peo­ple at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand. Just last month, a white suprema­cist shot and killed 22 peo­ple in a Wal­mart shop­ping cen­ter in El Paso, Texas. SAALT has doc­u­ment­ed over 500 acts of hate vio­lence tar­get­ing our com­mu­ni­ties and over 270 instances of xeno­pho­bic polit­i­cal rhetoric since Novem­ber 2016 alone.

Despite the par­al­lel efforts to ban, deport, crim­i­nal­ize, and tar­get our com­mu­ni­ties with vio­lence, we still have oppor­tu­ni­ties to reclaim our power:

  • Demand that your Mem­ber of Con­gress REJECT the cre­ation of NEW domes­tic ter­ror­ism charges to fight white suprema­cy. This would only serve to fur­ther harm com­mu­ni­ties of col­or who have always been the tar­gets of such policies. 
  • Join the fight to repeal the Mus­lim Ban by sup­port­ing the No Mus­lim Ban Ever cam­paign and DEMAND Con­gress to pass the NO BAN Act. Stay tuned for more infor­ma­tion on the Sep­tem­ber 24th Con­gres­sion­al hear­ing on the Mus­lim Ban.
  • URGE your Mem­ber of Con­gress to sup­port the Khalid Jabara Heather Hey­er NO HATE Act, a com­pre­hen­sive bill that pro­motes more accu­rate hate crimes data col­lec­tion and would pro­vide sup­port for hate crime vic­tims and their fam­i­lies. It is named in hon­or of two recent vic­tims of hate crimes, whose deaths were omit­ted from the FBI hate crimes statistics.

Con­tact: sophia@saalt.org

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