SAALT Welcomes Khalid Jabara and Heather Heyer NO HATE Act

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

June 27, 2019 

WASHINGTON, D.C. –  SAALT wel­comes Sen­a­tor Richard Blu­men­thal (D‑CT) and Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin’s (D‑IL)  intro­duc­tion of the Khalid Jabara and Heather Hey­er NO HATE Act.  Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Don­ald Bey­er (D‑VA) and Pete Olson (R‑TX) intro­duced the com­pan­ion bill in the House. The bill — which pro­motes more accu­rate hate crimes data col­lec­tion and would pro­vide sup­port for hate crime vic­tims and their fam­i­lies — marks a major step in hate crimes leg­is­la­tion. 

Khalid Jabara was killed on his doorstep in Tul­sa, Okla­homa on August 12, 2016. One year lat­er, on the same day, Heather Hey­er was killed dur­ing a protest in Char­lottesville, Vir­ginia. Both deaths were pros­e­cut­ed as hate crimes, yet nei­ther were report­ed in offi­cial FBI hate crimes sta­tis­tics. Both killings were moti­vat­ed by white suprema­cy.  

A coali­tion of com­mu­ni­ty and civ­il rights orga­ni­za­tions have been work­ing close­ly with Khalid and Heather’s fam­i­lies to ensure that fam­i­lies do not have to endure the same pain they have endured.  The first step to achiev­ing this is under­stand­ing the sys­temic under­pin­nings of hate vio­lence and insti­tut­ing more effec­tive ways to man­date hate crime data col­lec­tion. Every lev­el of gov­ern­ment must be held account­able for address­ing the spike in hate vio­lence aimed at our com­mu­ni­ties. The Khalid Jabara and Heather Hey­er NO HATE Act can play an instru­men­tal role in lay­ing this ground­work,” said Lak­sh­mi Sri­daran, Inter­im Co-Exec­u­tive Direc­tor of South Asian Amer­i­cans Lead­ing Togeth­er (SAALT).  

SAALT has doc­u­ment­ed over 484 inci­dents of hate vio­lence against South Asian, Mus­lim, Sikh, Hin­du, Mid­dle East­ern, and Arab Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ties around the coun­try since  Novem­ber 2015.  Read the lat­est hate report here

CONTACT: sophia@saalt.org

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Statement of Concern Regarding April 9 Congressional Hearing on Hate Crimes and White Nationalism

April 8, 2019

Dear Chair­man Nadler and Rank­ing Mem­ber Collins,

We write to share our con­cerns with you and mem­bers of the House Judi­cia­ry Com­mit­tee regard­ing the April 9 hear­ing on Hate Crimes and The Rise of White Nation­al­ism. We believe these are urgent issues and that Con­gress should be pay­ing close atten­tion, espe­cial­ly in light of the rise of hate crimes in the Unit­ed States and the role that domes­tic white nation­al­ist groups have here at home, and on a glob­al scale.

On Tues­day, April 9, Con­gress is hold­ing a hear­ing on hate vio­lence and white nation­al­ism.  Accord­ing to the announce­ment, the House Judi­cia­ry Com­mit­tee plans to “exam­ine hate crimes, the impact white nation­al­ist groups have on Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ties and the spread of white iden­ti­ty ide­ol­o­gy.” We believe these are urgent issues and that Con­gress should be pay­ing close atten­tion, espe­cial­ly in light of the rise of hate crimes in the Unit­ed States and the role that domes­tic white nation­al­ist groups have here at home, and on a glob­al scale.

As orga­ni­za­tions work­ing with Mus­lim, South Asian, Sikh, and Arab com­mu­ni­ties, we are deeply aware of how hate vio­lence has become a per­va­sive issue affect­ing our com­mu­ni­ties and oth­er mar­gin­al­ized com­mu­ni­ties. We are heart­ened to know that the wit­ness list for Tuesday’s hear­ing includes Dr. Abu Sal­ha whose two Mus­lim daugh­ters and son-in-law were mur­dered in a bru­tal hate crime in Chapel Hill, North Car­oli­na in 2015.

How­ev­er, Tuesday’s hear­ing fails to com­pre­hen­sive­ly address the scope and mag­ni­tude of hate vio­lence that dis­pro­por­tion­ate­ly impacts Black, Mus­lim, Sikh, South Asian, and Arab Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ties. Nor does the hear­ing uti­lize an oppor­tu­ni­ty  to unearth the com­plex moti­va­tions behind white nation­al­ism or its effects, includ­ing hate vio­lence. Apart from Dr. Abu Sal­ha, it is not sur­vivor-cen­tered, and the GOP wit­ness list includes sev­er­al indi­vid­u­als whose actions and insti­tu­tions have helped cat­alyze hate crimes, not abate them. For exam­ple, the wit­ness list includes Can­dace Owens, Direc­tor of Com­mu­ni­ca­tions at Turn­ing Point USA, who tweet­ed “LOL” after the Christchurch mas­sacre and who was list­ed as an inspi­ra­tion in the man­i­festo released by the white suprema­cist who is respon­si­ble for the mas­sacre of at least 50 Mus­lims in New Zealand. The list also includes Mor­ton Klein, pres­i­dent of the Zion­ist Orga­ni­za­tion of Amer­i­ca who used the slur “filthy Arabs” just last year. It is impor­tant that white nation­al­ism and white suprema­cy are not treat­ed as redeemable ide­olo­gies.

It is unfath­omable as to why wit­ness­es who espouse hate­ful posi­tions and rep­re­sent racist insti­tu­tions would be includ­ed giv­en their active dis­crim­i­na­tion  against Mus­lims and Arabs. Addi­tion­al­ly, the hear­ing does not  thor­ough­ly exam­ine  the var­i­ous and dom­i­nant strands of white nation­al­ism, includ­ing zion­ism; the con­nec­tion between polit­i­cal rhetoric, state poli­cies, and the rise in hate crimes; nor does it include sur­vivors who expe­ri­enced hate vio­lence since the 2016 elec­tion; or gov­ern­ment offi­cials who should be held account­able for how fed­er­al agen­cies and law enforce­ment enti­ties are active­ly address­ing white nation­al­ism and hate vio­lence.

We demand that Con­gress hold sub­stan­tive hear­ings that cen­ter sur­vivors and that unequiv­o­cal­ly reject white nation­al­ism, white suprema­cy, Islam­o­pho­bia, racism, and hate vio­lence in all its forms. Sim­i­lar Con­gres­sion­al hear­ings have fall­en short of exam­in­ing the depth of white suprema­cist hate vio­lence and our com­mu­ni­ties con­tin­ue to pay the price. The 2017 FBI hate crimes sta­tis­tics revealed an increase in hate crimes for the third year in a row, a 17% increase from the pri­or year. This is an alarm­ing upward trend in hate crimes – now con­sis­tent­ly sur­pass­ing the spike imme­di­ate­ly after Sep­tem­ber 11, 2001. Sur­vivors of hate vio­lence and big­otry deserve hon­est inquiries and true jus­tice from their elect­ed offi­cials. Con­gress must hold sub­se­quent hear­ings that com­pre­hen­sive­ly con­front and address the pro­lif­er­a­tion of white suprema­cist and white nation­al­ist hate vio­lence.

Signed,

Amer­i­can — Arab Anti-Dis­crim­i­na­tion Com­mit­tee (ADC)

Arab Amer­i­can Asso­ci­a­tion of New York (AAANY)

Arab Amer­i­can Bar Asso­ci­a­tion

Arab Resource and Orga­niz­ing Cen­ter (AROC)

Asian/Pacific Islander Domes­tic Vio­lence Resource Project (API DVRP)

Cen­ter for Con­sti­tu­tion­al Rights (CCR)

Coun­cil on Amer­i­can-Islam­ic Rela­tions (CAIR)

DRUM — Desis Ris­ing Up & Mov­ing

HEART Women & Girls

Jus­tice For Mus­lims Col­lec­tive

Mus­lim Anti-Racism Col­lab­o­ra­tive

Mus­lim Social Jus­tice Ini­tia­tive

Nation­al Net­work for Arab Amer­i­can Com­mu­ni­ties (NNAAC)

Nation­al Queer Asian Pacif­ic Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

Project South

Sikh Coali­tion

South Asian Amer­i­cans Lead­ing Togeth­er (SAALT)

South Asian Work­ers’ Cen­ter Boston

The Part­ner­ship For The Advance­ment of New Amer­i­cans (PANA)

Unit­ed We Dream

Two years too long: Repeal the Muslim Ban

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan­u­ary 27, 2019

Two years ago today, the Trump Admin­is­tra­tion announced its Mus­lim and refugee ban. From the ban to the mil­i­ta­riza­tion of the bor­der to restric­tions on asy­lum seek­ers, the Trump Administration’s racist poli­cies are tear­ing fam­i­lies apart. These racist poli­cies are enact­ed in an envi­ron­ment where xeno­pho­bic polit­i­cal rhetoric is all too fre­quent.

In SAALT’s 2018 report Com­mu­ni­ties on Fire, we found that one in five per­pe­tra­tors of hate vio­lence inci­dents ref­er­enced Pres­i­dent Trump, a Trump pol­i­cy, or a Trump cam­paign slo­gan. This data demon­strates a strong link between this admin­is­tra­tion’s anti-Mus­lim, anti-immi­grant rhetoric and hate vio­lence. We have doc­u­ment­ed over 300 inci­dents of hate vio­lence to date since Novem­ber 2016 aimed at South Asian, Mus­lim, Sikh, Hin­du, Mid­dle East­ern, and Arab Amer­i­cans.

As we wel­come a new Con­gress and as the gov­ern­ment reopens, it is imper­a­tive that elect­ed offi­cials exer­cise their lead­er­ship to ter­mi­nate the Mus­lim Ban and ensure it is nev­er repli­cat­ed. SAALT sup­ports leg­isla­tive solu­tions that will at the very least block fund­ing to imple­ment the Mus­lim Ban, but ide­al­ly lim­it exec­u­tive author­i­ty to insti­tute dis­crim­i­na­to­ry bans in the future.

Two years of a Mus­lim Ban is two years too many.  This anniver­sary must be a call to action to Con­gress to use their pow­er to end this exam­ple of state-spon­sored dis­crim­i­na­tion and keep our com­mu­ni­ties and nation whole.

CONTACT: Sophia Qureshi, sophia@saalt.org

New FBI hate crimes statistics show disturbing surge in hate crimes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Novem­ber 13th, 2018

Ear­li­er today, the FBI released its annu­al hate crimes sta­tis­tics report for 2017. The data, while a vast under­es­ti­mate of the vio­lence our com­mu­ni­ties face, con­tin­ues to show an increase in hate crimes for the third year in a row. The num­ber of hate crimes report­ed to the FBI in 2017 went up to 7,175 from 6,121 in 2016, rep­re­sent­ing a 17% increase, a sig­nif­i­cant jump from the five per­cent increase between 2015 and 2016. This is an alarm­ing upward trend of hate crimes – now con­sis­tent­ly sur­pass­ing the spike imme­di­ate­ly after Sep­tem­ber 11, 2001. The surge in hate crimes against Sikh and Arab Amer­i­cans, which rose by 243% and 100% respec­tive­ly since 2016 is par­tic­u­lar­ly dis­turb­ing. And, while the over­all num­ber of hate crimes tar­get­ing Mus­lim Amer­i­cans decreased by 11%, the 2017 total of 273 anti-Mus­lim hate crimes con­tin­ues to be a his­tor­i­cal­ly high num­ber. Since Novem­ber 2016, SAALT’s data on inci­dents of hate vio­lence aimed at South Asian, Mus­lim, Sikh, Hin­du, Mid­dle East­ern, and Arab Amer­i­cans show that over 80% of the doc­u­ment­ed inci­dents are moti­vat­ed by anti-Mus­lim sen­ti­ment.

Under­re­port­ing of hate crimes by local law enforce­ment agen­cies to the FBI remains a major prob­lem. Accord­ing to ProPublica’s “Doc­u­ment­ing Hate” project, thou­sands of local law enforce­ment agen­cies choose not to report hate crimes sta­tis­tics to the FBI at all; of those that do par­tic­i­pate, 88% report­ed zero hate crimes in 2016 close­ly mir­ror­ing the 87% who report­ed zero hate crimes in 2017. A sep­a­rate ProP­ub­li­ca inves­ti­ga­tion revealed that 120 fed­er­al agen­cies have not com­plied with man­dates to sub­mit hate crime data to the FBI. In fact, the FBI itself does not con­sis­tent­ly sub­mit the hate crimes it inves­ti­gates to its own data­base. We echo the con­cern shared by our part­ners at the Arab Amer­i­can Insti­tute, iden­ti­fy­ing glar­ing omis­sions from the 2017 hate crimes sta­tis­tics. In par­tic­u­lar, the fail­ure to include Srini­vas Kuchib­hot­la’s 2017 mur­der at the hands of a white suprema­cist in Olathe, Kansas. His killer, Adam Pur­in­ton, was con­vict­ed on a fed­er­al hate crimes charge ear­li­er this year.

The lack of polit­i­cal will on the part of the Depart­ment of Jus­tice to col­lect this crit­i­cal data com­bined with this administration’s flawed approach to under­stand­ing and address­ing hate crimes makes us all less safe and places a bur­den of data col­lec­tion on com­mu­ni­ties. Addi­tion­al­ly, this administration’s con­tin­ued refusal to acknowl­edge the grow­ing prob­lem of white suprema­cy ignores the pri­ma­ry moti­va­tion behind the vio­lence tar­get­ing our com­mu­ni­ties. The 2017 FBI data shows that of the over 6,000 hate crimes where the race of the offend­er was report­ed, over 50% of the per­pe­tra­tors were iden­ti­fied as white. SAALT’s data as illus­trat­ed in our 2018 report Com­mu­ni­ties on Fire report found that per­pe­tra­tors of hate vio­lence ref­er­enced Pres­i­dent Trump, a Trump admin­is­tra­tion pol­i­cy, or a Trump cam­paign slo­gan in one out of every five hate inci­dents doc­u­ment­ed. White suprema­cist vio­lence, fanned by the flames of racist rhetoric and poli­cies at the fed­er­al lev­el, has dev­as­tat­ed mar­gin­al­ized com­mu­ni­ties. Until this admin­is­tra­tion con­fronts this cri­sis, we will con­tin­ue to face a surge in hate crimes aimed at our com­mu­ni­ties.

Daily Buzz 2.16.2009

1.) Pak­istani Amer­i­can Charged with Behead­ing His Wife

2.) Indi­a’s Unlike­ly New Immi­grants: Indi­an Amer­i­cans Immi­grat­ing to India

3.) Hate Crime Charges filed in attack on cab dri­ver

4.) New UC eli­gi­bil­i­ty stan­dards will open col­lege doors, but may change demo­graph­ics

5.) Rachel Mad­dow joins the “Con­sor­tium of Pub-going, loose, and for­ward women.”

6.)  Ennis from Sepia Mutiny: Speak Hin­di? Join the Army and become a cit­i­zen in six months.

A Time of Transition: Immigrant Rights in a Changing Landscape

Check out this blog post from Just Democ­ra­cy that high­lights the ways that the elec­tion of the first minor­i­ty Pres­i­dent has impact­ed the immi­grant rights land­scape, for bet­ter or worse-

A Time of Transition: Immigrant Rights in a Changing Landscape

By Deepa Iyer

As an immi­grant who moved from the south­ern part of India to the Amer­i­can South in the mid 1980s, race has been a cor­ner­stone of my iden­ti­ty for decades. In class­rooms in Ken­tucky, my peers didn’t know quite what to make of me: you were either white or black, and no shade of gray exist­ed for folks like me, who grap­pled with bicul­tur­al iden­ti­ties and immi­grant expe­ri­ences. I remem­ber con­stant­ly nurs­ing an acute sense of want­i­ng to belong and to be under­stood- at school among my peers, among fam­i­lies in the neigh­bor­hood, and even among rel­a­tives and friends back in India as my lifestyle and inter­ests slow­ly changed.

I seemed to con­front the label of the “oth­er” in count­less ways, due, per­haps, to my Indi­an accent, or cul­tur­al cus­toms and tra­di­tions that seemed out of place, or the strug­gles of my immi­grant par­ents who expe­ri­enced an even more dif­fi­cult tran­si­tion than I did. My child­hood immi­grant expe­ri­ence is not very dif­fer­ent from thou­sands of oth­ers who also make the jour­ney from else­where to here. And yet, those expe­ri­ences are often not part of the Amer­i­can sto­ry as it is told, per­ceived, and framed; they are out­side the scope of what is con­sid­ered to be “main­stream” and accept­able. That is why I have been watch­ing the elec­tion and pres­i­den­cy of Barack Hus­sein Oba­ma with such great inter­est.

With his unique name, his diverse fam­i­ly, and his child­hood expe­ri­ences in oth­er parts of the world, Pres­i­dent Obama’s sto­ry res­onates with those of us who have tra­versed sim­i­lar paths. Many of us feel a sense of famil­iar­i­ty with a nation­al fig­ure and pub­lic leader in a way that we have not felt before. The elec­tion of Pres­i­dent Oba­ma sig­nals that Amer­i­ca is, per­haps, ready to be more inclu­sive, to expand its nar­ra­tive, to accept what has for so long been side­lined as the “oth­er.”

Yet, as the impact of Pres­i­dent Obama’s his­toric pres­i­den­cy is being explored, advo­cates and activists know well that we have much work to do to real­ize the fun­da­men­tal ideals of equal­i­ty and jus­tice in the Unit­ed States and around the world. This is cer­tain­ly the case when it comes to the wel­fare and rights of immi­grants in this coun­try, who con­tin­ue to be mar­gin­al­ized, alien­at­ed, and scape­goat­ed, despite the tremen­dous sac­ri­fices and con­tri­bu­tions they make every day.

How will the Oba­ma Admin­is­tra­tion and the new Con­gress con­front the numer­ous chal­lenges that have been cre­at­ed by the bro­ken immi­gra­tion sys­tem in this coun­try? Cer­tain­ly, immi­grant rights advo­cates hope that there will be mul­ti­ple entry points for dis­cus­sion and action with pol­i­cy­mak­ers and con­gres­sion­al lead­ers, giv­en the polit­i­cal changes afoot in Wash­ing­ton. The tenor for these pol­i­cy dis­cus­sions will also be set by the vary­ing sen­ti­ments that the pub­lic has towards immi­grants. Will the anti-immi­grant back­lash that has per­me­at­ed the coun­try over the past decade shift? Will the gen­er­al feel­ing towards immi­grants be one of inclu­sion and open­ness, giv­en that we have elect­ed the nation’s first pres­i­dent of col­or?

Recent inci­dents show that as a coun­try, we still have a long way to go. In the week after Barack Obama’s elec­tion, a spate of bias inci­dents and hate crimes were report­ed around the coun­try. One such inci­dent involved a cross that was burned on the front lawn of an Indi­an-Amer­i­can fam­i­ly in New Jer­sey; around the charred cross was the family’s Oba­ma vic­to­ry ban­ner. One of the fam­i­ly mem­bers was report­ed say­ing: “Liv­ing in the 21st cen­tu­ry, and we have to deal with this – in Amer­i­ca.”

In Decem­ber 2008, a group of men par­tic­i­pat­ed in the beat­ing death of a Lati­no man in New York City who was strolling with his broth­er. And as the new year began, we heard of a fam­i­ly of Mus­lim pas­sen­gers who were removed from an Air Tran flight due to pas­sen­ger dis­com­fort. As we per­suade the new admin­is­tra­tion and pol­i­cy­mak­ers in Wash­ing­ton to put forth leg­is­la­tion and poli­cies that pre­serve the rights of immi­grants – the recent reau­tho­riza­tion of the State Children’s Health Insur­ance Pro­gram (SCHIP) which includes pro­vi­sions for immi­grant chil­dren and women is a pos­i­tive exam­ple – we also have to change the way that ordi­nary Amer­i­cans per­ceive immi­grants in their own com­mu­ni­ties.

This moment in time presents a tremen­dous oppor­tu­ni­ty for a new direc­tion in the pub­lic dia­logue about the con­tri­bu­tions, needs, and chal­lenges of immi­grants. The cli­mate of open­ness in the coun­try, cat­alyzed by an elec­tion that saw unprece­dent­ed vot­er-engage­ment rates and a his­toric pres­i­den­cy that has moved many to heed the call to ser­vice and action, can also sig­ni­fy a new era for immi­grant rights. Here is an oppor­tu­ni­ty for us to destroy that us-ver­sus-them dynam­ic once and for all. And to do so, we must start in our com­mu­ni­ties and our class­rooms, as well as in dis­cus­sions at our kitchen tables. We must engage the pub­lic through our local news­pa­pers and at town hall meet­ings, so that immi­grant chil­dren and fam­i­lies in Ken­tucky, Kansas and around the nation feel con­nect­ed to the Amer­i­can sto­ry that is being rein­vent­ed and re-imag­ined through this elec­tion.

Deepa Iyer has been advo­cat­ing for civ­il and immi­grant rights for near­ly a decade through her work. She is cur­rent­ly the Exec­u­tive Direc­tor of South Asian Amer­i­cans Lead­ing Togeth­er (SAALT), a nation­al non-prof­it orga­ni­za­tion ded­i­cat­ed to fos­ter­ing civic and polit­i­cal engage­ment by South Asian com­mu­ni­ties around the Unit­ed States.

SAALT and Community Partners Issue Statement Regarding Recent Bias Crimes Targeting South Asians in New Jersey

You may be sur­prised to learn that near­ly 200,000 South Asians reside in the state of New Jer­sey.  SAALT’s New Jer­sey Com­mu­ni­ty Empow­er­ment Project devel­oped from a series of meet­ings in 2004 with South Asian orga­ni­za­tions in New Jer­sey, allies, and con­cerned South Asian indi­vid­u­als.  Through these dia­logues, it became clear that South Asian com­mu­ni­ties in New Jer­sey are under­served and large­ly voice­less in pol­i­cy debates. To learn more about the New Jer­sey Com­mu­ni­ty Empow­er­ment Project, or to read our report high­light­ing key issues affect­ing the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty in New Jer­sey, “A Com­mu­ni­ty of Con­trasts: South Asians in New Jer­sey,” please check out SAALT’s local ini­tia­tives page.

In response to recent bias-crimes tar­get­ed towards the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty in New Jer­sey, SAALT, along with sev­er­al South Asian com­mu­ni­ty part­ners — Man­avi; South Asian Men­tal Health Aware­ness in Jer­sey (SAMHAJ); the Coun­cil on Amer­i­can Islam­ic Rela­tions (CAIR-NJ); UNITED SIKHS; and the Sikh Coali­tion issued a joint state­ment con­demn­ing all bias crimes.  Read the state­ment below:

“We come togeth­er, as orga­ni­za­tions serv­ing South Asian com­mu­ni­ties here in New Jer­sey, to denounce the recent hate crimes and bias inci­dents that have tak­en place in our state.  The South Asian com­mu­ni­ty in New Jer­sey, with a grow­ing pop­u­la­tion of 200,000, has long con­front­ed bias and dis­crim­i­na­tion, begin­ning in the 1980’s with the attacks per­pe­trat­ed by the ‘Dot­busters’ and the post‑9/11 back­lash.  In addi­tion, our orga­ni­za­tions — Man­avi; the Sikh Coali­tion; the Coun­cil on Amer­i­can Islam­ic Rela­tions (CAIR-NJ); South Asian Men­tal Health Aware­ness in Jer­sey (SAMHAJ); and UNITED SIKHS — have observed a rise in New Jer­sey, which we believe has fos­tered an envi­ron­ment where bias inci­dents and hate crimes can occur.

Today, we stand in sol­i­dar­i­ty not only with the Gre­w­al fam­i­ly — vic­tims of a cross-burn­ing out­side their home; Mr. Ajit Singh Chi­ma — an elder­ly Sikh man who, on Octo­ber 30th, in Wayne, New Jer­sey, was vio­lent­ly punched and kicked in the face sev­er­al times by an uniden­ti­fied man, and as a result suf­fered sev­er­al frac­tures around his eyes and jaw; Gan­gadeep Singh — a fifth grade stu­dent who, on Octo­ber 8th, was attacked in Carteret, New Jer­sey while walk­ing home from school by an uniden­ti­fied masked assailant that threw him on the ground and cut off his hair — but with all sur­vivors of bias and hate crimes.

We stand togeth­er now because we must say no to any act of bias and intol­er­ance when it hap­pens.  We stand togeth­er to ask our elect­ed offi­cials and law enforce­ment agen­cies to pro­tect sur­vivors of hate crimes and to join us in con­demn­ing them.  As a vibrant seg­ment of New Jer­sey’s neigh­bor­hoods, schools, busi­ness­es, and non-prof­it sec­tors, South Asians raise our voic­es to call for jus­tice and equal­i­ty for all.”

Please join us for a march and ral­ly in sup­port of the Gre­w­al fam­i­ly on Sat­ur­day, Novem­ber 15th at 3PM in Hard­wick, New Jer­sey.  The ‘Uni­ty for the Com­mu­ni­ty’ March will start at the Munic­i­pal Build­ing and end at the Gre­w­al res­i­dence with a ral­ly. 

Satur­day, Novem­ber 5th, 3PM
Hard­wick Munic­i­pal Build­ing
40 Spring Val­ley Road
Hard­wick, NJ 07825
If you’d like to attend but do not have a ride, please con­tact Qudsia:
(qudsia@saalt.org) or call (201) 850‑3333.

Addi­tion­al­ly, if you’d like to learn more about bias and hate crimes, check out a new resource by SAALT:  “Know Your Rights Resource Address­ing Hate Crimes”

Have you seen “Raising Our Voices”?

In Jan­u­ary 2001, SAALT began work on a 26-minute doc­u­men­tary enti­tled “Rais­ing Our Voic­es: South Asian Amer­i­cans Address Hate.” Pro­duced by Omusha Com­mu­ni­ca­tions and guid­ed by SAALT Board mem­bers and vol­un­teers, the doc­u­men­tary set out to raise aware­ness about the increas­ing hate crimes and bias inci­dents affect­ing South Asian com­mu­ni­ties, espe­cial­ly in the late 1990s. In fact, in 1997 and 1998, South Asians were report­ing the high­est inci­dences of bias-moti­vat­ed crimes in the broad­er Asian Amer­i­can com­mu­ni­ty.

The doc­u­men­tary fea­tures South Asian sur­vivors of hate crimes and their fam­i­lies in Queens, New Jer­sey, Pitts­burgh and Los Ange­les, as well as orga­niz­ers, lawyers and com­mu­ni­ty advo­cates who mobi­lized the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty and demand­ed jus­tice.  When the film was com­plet­ed two weeks before Sep­tem­ber 11th, 2001, lit­tle did we know how the land­scape of the South Asian com­mu­ni­ty in the Unit­ed States would change.  With the alarm­ing increase of hate crimes, bias inci­dents, and pro­fil­ing that South Asians, espe­cial­ly those who are Sikh and Mus­lim, endured in the days and months after 9/11, SAALT re-envi­sioned the doc­u­men­tary and shot addi­tion­al footage.

The doc­u­men­tary has been out since 2002, but you may not have seen it in its entire­ty yet. It has been used in class­rooms and town­halls around the coun­try and we encour­age you to engage with it, com­ment on it, and if pos­si­ble, to share it with friends, fam­i­ly, cowork­ers and com­mu­ni­ty mem­bers.

You can view it here:

Part 1

Part 2 Please email us at saalt@saalt.org with your feed­back, reac­tions, and com­ments. Feel free to use this doc­u­men­tary in your com­mu­ni­ty, uni­ver­si­ty, or your per­son­al net­work of col­leagues and friends.